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Walmart Files Patent for Robotic Bees

Walmart Files Patent for Robotic Bees


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Anyone who has watched ‘Hated in the Nation’ will understand

Dreamstime

Not pictured: Walmart's robotic bees

Walmart has filed a patent for “pollination drones” — in other words, robot bees. The retail giant — which has clearly never seen the sixth episode of the third season of Black Mirror, in which robot bees intended for pollination turn killer and attack — has applied for a series of six patents targeting farm automation, according to CB Insights.

The outlet also reported the drones could be used to “identify pests attacking crops, monitor crop damage, spray pesticides, and pollinate crops.” In other words, they are designed to seek and destroy and are armed with payloads of toxins and allergens.

In seriousness, groceries comprise 56 percent of Walmart’s revenue according to Fortune, so advanced farming technology could reduce costs and assist Walmart in getting produce to consumers more effectively. However, the news is seriously freaking social media users out.

There was an episode of #BlackMirror that covered this exact scenario.

Purpose was for pollination, but evolved into a ‘swarm logic’ surveillance/ assassination tool.

— Tim (@Krommsan) March 15, 2018

This is not the first time Walmart has filed patents for drones. According to Fortune the retailer has applied for 46 other patents using drones, but those focus on delivery, logistics, and warehouse inventory and don’t include swarms of autonomous poison-spraying robots.

Walmart told The Daily Meal, "We’re always thinking about new concepts and ways that will help us further enhance how we serve customers, but we don’t have any further details to share on these patents at this time."

Had no idea Walmart was getting so into technology? Here are 20 things you didn’t know about Walmart. Study up before they become our new overlords.


Robot bees: Walmart plots global pollination (IMAGE)

The patent for the co-called &lsquopollination drones&rsquo was filed earlier in March as part of a series of six focusing on automated farming. The robobees would, according to the patent, use a &ldquopollen applicator configured to collect pollen from a flower of a first crop&rdquo and then, using sensors and cameras, find their way to other flowers to apply said pollen onto them.

Though it&rsquos not immediately clear what the company&rsquos plans for the robotic swarm patent are, some analysts have suggested that the retail giant is hoping to gain a stronger foothold in agriculture and gain more control over its supply chain.

Honeybees, responsible for pollinating almost a third of the food eaten by humans, have been dying at an alarming rate over the past number of years. The decline of the honeybee is said to be the result of a phenomenon called &lsquoColony Collapse Disorder&rsquo though the exact cause of the decline is not yet known.

One recent study points to commonly used fungicides as a major culprit. &ldquoWe threw everything but the kitchen sink at this analysis and the &lsquowinner&rsquo was fungicides,&rdquo study lead author Scott McArt back in December. &ldquoIt turns out that fungicide use is the best predictor of bumblebees getting sick and being lost from sites across the US.&rdquo

Perhaps robotic swarms of bees, like the one produced by Harvard University researchers in 2013, offer a feasible solution for mankind in a world in which real bees are being placed on the endangered species list.

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!


Robot bees: Walmart plots global pollination (IMAGE)

The patent for the co-called &lsquopollination drones&rsquo was filed earlier in March as part of a series of six focusing on automated farming. The robobees would, according to the patent, use a &ldquopollen applicator configured to collect pollen from a flower of a first crop&rdquo and then, using sensors and cameras, find their way to other flowers to apply said pollen onto them.

Though it&rsquos not immediately clear what the company&rsquos plans for the robotic swarm patent are, some analysts have suggested that the retail giant is hoping to gain a stronger foothold in agriculture and gain more control over its supply chain.

Honeybees, responsible for pollinating almost a third of the food eaten by humans, have been dying at an alarming rate over the past number of years. The decline of the honeybee is said to be the result of a phenomenon called &lsquoColony Collapse Disorder&rsquo though the exact cause of the decline is not yet known.

One recent study points to commonly used fungicides as a major culprit. &ldquoWe threw everything but the kitchen sink at this analysis and the &lsquowinner&rsquo was fungicides,&rdquo study lead author Scott McArt back in December. &ldquoIt turns out that fungicide use is the best predictor of bumblebees getting sick and being lost from sites across the US.&rdquo

Perhaps robotic swarms of bees, like the one produced by Harvard University researchers in 2013, offer a feasible solution for mankind in a world in which real bees are being placed on the endangered species list.

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!


Robot bees: Walmart plots global pollination (IMAGE)

The patent for the co-called &lsquopollination drones&rsquo was filed earlier in March as part of a series of six focusing on automated farming. The robobees would, according to the patent, use a &ldquopollen applicator configured to collect pollen from a flower of a first crop&rdquo and then, using sensors and cameras, find their way to other flowers to apply said pollen onto them.

Though it&rsquos not immediately clear what the company&rsquos plans for the robotic swarm patent are, some analysts have suggested that the retail giant is hoping to gain a stronger foothold in agriculture and gain more control over its supply chain.

Honeybees, responsible for pollinating almost a third of the food eaten by humans, have been dying at an alarming rate over the past number of years. The decline of the honeybee is said to be the result of a phenomenon called &lsquoColony Collapse Disorder&rsquo though the exact cause of the decline is not yet known.

One recent study points to commonly used fungicides as a major culprit. &ldquoWe threw everything but the kitchen sink at this analysis and the &lsquowinner&rsquo was fungicides,&rdquo study lead author Scott McArt back in December. &ldquoIt turns out that fungicide use is the best predictor of bumblebees getting sick and being lost from sites across the US.&rdquo

Perhaps robotic swarms of bees, like the one produced by Harvard University researchers in 2013, offer a feasible solution for mankind in a world in which real bees are being placed on the endangered species list.

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!


Robot bees: Walmart plots global pollination (IMAGE)

The patent for the co-called &lsquopollination drones&rsquo was filed earlier in March as part of a series of six focusing on automated farming. The robobees would, according to the patent, use a &ldquopollen applicator configured to collect pollen from a flower of a first crop&rdquo and then, using sensors and cameras, find their way to other flowers to apply said pollen onto them.

Though it&rsquos not immediately clear what the company&rsquos plans for the robotic swarm patent are, some analysts have suggested that the retail giant is hoping to gain a stronger foothold in agriculture and gain more control over its supply chain.

Honeybees, responsible for pollinating almost a third of the food eaten by humans, have been dying at an alarming rate over the past number of years. The decline of the honeybee is said to be the result of a phenomenon called &lsquoColony Collapse Disorder&rsquo though the exact cause of the decline is not yet known.

One recent study points to commonly used fungicides as a major culprit. &ldquoWe threw everything but the kitchen sink at this analysis and the &lsquowinner&rsquo was fungicides,&rdquo study lead author Scott McArt back in December. &ldquoIt turns out that fungicide use is the best predictor of bumblebees getting sick and being lost from sites across the US.&rdquo

Perhaps robotic swarms of bees, like the one produced by Harvard University researchers in 2013, offer a feasible solution for mankind in a world in which real bees are being placed on the endangered species list.

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!


Robot bees: Walmart plots global pollination (IMAGE)

The patent for the co-called &lsquopollination drones&rsquo was filed earlier in March as part of a series of six focusing on automated farming. The robobees would, according to the patent, use a &ldquopollen applicator configured to collect pollen from a flower of a first crop&rdquo and then, using sensors and cameras, find their way to other flowers to apply said pollen onto them.

Though it&rsquos not immediately clear what the company&rsquos plans for the robotic swarm patent are, some analysts have suggested that the retail giant is hoping to gain a stronger foothold in agriculture and gain more control over its supply chain.

Honeybees, responsible for pollinating almost a third of the food eaten by humans, have been dying at an alarming rate over the past number of years. The decline of the honeybee is said to be the result of a phenomenon called &lsquoColony Collapse Disorder&rsquo though the exact cause of the decline is not yet known.

One recent study points to commonly used fungicides as a major culprit. &ldquoWe threw everything but the kitchen sink at this analysis and the &lsquowinner&rsquo was fungicides,&rdquo study lead author Scott McArt back in December. &ldquoIt turns out that fungicide use is the best predictor of bumblebees getting sick and being lost from sites across the US.&rdquo

Perhaps robotic swarms of bees, like the one produced by Harvard University researchers in 2013, offer a feasible solution for mankind in a world in which real bees are being placed on the endangered species list.

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!


Robot bees: Walmart plots global pollination (IMAGE)

The patent for the co-called &lsquopollination drones&rsquo was filed earlier in March as part of a series of six focusing on automated farming. The robobees would, according to the patent, use a &ldquopollen applicator configured to collect pollen from a flower of a first crop&rdquo and then, using sensors and cameras, find their way to other flowers to apply said pollen onto them.

Though it&rsquos not immediately clear what the company&rsquos plans for the robotic swarm patent are, some analysts have suggested that the retail giant is hoping to gain a stronger foothold in agriculture and gain more control over its supply chain.

Honeybees, responsible for pollinating almost a third of the food eaten by humans, have been dying at an alarming rate over the past number of years. The decline of the honeybee is said to be the result of a phenomenon called &lsquoColony Collapse Disorder&rsquo though the exact cause of the decline is not yet known.

One recent study points to commonly used fungicides as a major culprit. &ldquoWe threw everything but the kitchen sink at this analysis and the &lsquowinner&rsquo was fungicides,&rdquo study lead author Scott McArt back in December. &ldquoIt turns out that fungicide use is the best predictor of bumblebees getting sick and being lost from sites across the US.&rdquo

Perhaps robotic swarms of bees, like the one produced by Harvard University researchers in 2013, offer a feasible solution for mankind in a world in which real bees are being placed on the endangered species list.

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!


Robot bees: Walmart plots global pollination (IMAGE)

The patent for the co-called &lsquopollination drones&rsquo was filed earlier in March as part of a series of six focusing on automated farming. The robobees would, according to the patent, use a &ldquopollen applicator configured to collect pollen from a flower of a first crop&rdquo and then, using sensors and cameras, find their way to other flowers to apply said pollen onto them.

Though it&rsquos not immediately clear what the company&rsquos plans for the robotic swarm patent are, some analysts have suggested that the retail giant is hoping to gain a stronger foothold in agriculture and gain more control over its supply chain.

Honeybees, responsible for pollinating almost a third of the food eaten by humans, have been dying at an alarming rate over the past number of years. The decline of the honeybee is said to be the result of a phenomenon called &lsquoColony Collapse Disorder&rsquo though the exact cause of the decline is not yet known.

One recent study points to commonly used fungicides as a major culprit. &ldquoWe threw everything but the kitchen sink at this analysis and the &lsquowinner&rsquo was fungicides,&rdquo study lead author Scott McArt back in December. &ldquoIt turns out that fungicide use is the best predictor of bumblebees getting sick and being lost from sites across the US.&rdquo

Perhaps robotic swarms of bees, like the one produced by Harvard University researchers in 2013, offer a feasible solution for mankind in a world in which real bees are being placed on the endangered species list.

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!


Robot bees: Walmart plots global pollination (IMAGE)

The patent for the co-called &lsquopollination drones&rsquo was filed earlier in March as part of a series of six focusing on automated farming. The robobees would, according to the patent, use a &ldquopollen applicator configured to collect pollen from a flower of a first crop&rdquo and then, using sensors and cameras, find their way to other flowers to apply said pollen onto them.

Though it&rsquos not immediately clear what the company&rsquos plans for the robotic swarm patent are, some analysts have suggested that the retail giant is hoping to gain a stronger foothold in agriculture and gain more control over its supply chain.

Honeybees, responsible for pollinating almost a third of the food eaten by humans, have been dying at an alarming rate over the past number of years. The decline of the honeybee is said to be the result of a phenomenon called &lsquoColony Collapse Disorder&rsquo though the exact cause of the decline is not yet known.

One recent study points to commonly used fungicides as a major culprit. &ldquoWe threw everything but the kitchen sink at this analysis and the &lsquowinner&rsquo was fungicides,&rdquo study lead author Scott McArt back in December. &ldquoIt turns out that fungicide use is the best predictor of bumblebees getting sick and being lost from sites across the US.&rdquo

Perhaps robotic swarms of bees, like the one produced by Harvard University researchers in 2013, offer a feasible solution for mankind in a world in which real bees are being placed on the endangered species list.

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!


Robot bees: Walmart plots global pollination (IMAGE)

The patent for the co-called &lsquopollination drones&rsquo was filed earlier in March as part of a series of six focusing on automated farming. The robobees would, according to the patent, use a &ldquopollen applicator configured to collect pollen from a flower of a first crop&rdquo and then, using sensors and cameras, find their way to other flowers to apply said pollen onto them.

Though it&rsquos not immediately clear what the company&rsquos plans for the robotic swarm patent are, some analysts have suggested that the retail giant is hoping to gain a stronger foothold in agriculture and gain more control over its supply chain.

Honeybees, responsible for pollinating almost a third of the food eaten by humans, have been dying at an alarming rate over the past number of years. The decline of the honeybee is said to be the result of a phenomenon called &lsquoColony Collapse Disorder&rsquo though the exact cause of the decline is not yet known.

One recent study points to commonly used fungicides as a major culprit. &ldquoWe threw everything but the kitchen sink at this analysis and the &lsquowinner&rsquo was fungicides,&rdquo study lead author Scott McArt back in December. &ldquoIt turns out that fungicide use is the best predictor of bumblebees getting sick and being lost from sites across the US.&rdquo

Perhaps robotic swarms of bees, like the one produced by Harvard University researchers in 2013, offer a feasible solution for mankind in a world in which real bees are being placed on the endangered species list.

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!


Robot bees: Walmart plots global pollination (IMAGE)

The patent for the co-called &lsquopollination drones&rsquo was filed earlier in March as part of a series of six focusing on automated farming. The robobees would, according to the patent, use a &ldquopollen applicator configured to collect pollen from a flower of a first crop&rdquo and then, using sensors and cameras, find their way to other flowers to apply said pollen onto them.

Though it&rsquos not immediately clear what the company&rsquos plans for the robotic swarm patent are, some analysts have suggested that the retail giant is hoping to gain a stronger foothold in agriculture and gain more control over its supply chain.

Honeybees, responsible for pollinating almost a third of the food eaten by humans, have been dying at an alarming rate over the past number of years. The decline of the honeybee is said to be the result of a phenomenon called &lsquoColony Collapse Disorder&rsquo though the exact cause of the decline is not yet known.

One recent study points to commonly used fungicides as a major culprit. &ldquoWe threw everything but the kitchen sink at this analysis and the &lsquowinner&rsquo was fungicides,&rdquo study lead author Scott McArt back in December. &ldquoIt turns out that fungicide use is the best predictor of bumblebees getting sick and being lost from sites across the US.&rdquo

Perhaps robotic swarms of bees, like the one produced by Harvard University researchers in 2013, offer a feasible solution for mankind in a world in which real bees are being placed on the endangered species list.

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!


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Comments:

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  2. Doujinn

    hit the spot.

  3. Nulte

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  4. Macneill

    The morning is wiser than the evening.

  5. Macniall

    There is something in this. I used to think differently, thanks a lot for the help on this issue.



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